Category Archives: beans

Beans, Beans, the Magical Fruit..

beans

by Hesh Goldstein 

(NaturalNews) The more you eat, the lower your risk of certain cancers.

Beans have more servings of fiber than any other vegetable. One single serving will give you 20 percent of your daily-recommended fiber.

Researchers in Japan did a seven-year study. They studied more than 43,000 people between the ages of 40 and 79 that had high cancer rates and ate little fiber. The more fiber they got from beans, the lower the risk of colon cancer, especially in men, became. It was the bean fiber that impacted the colon cancer statistics more than any other source of fiber.

Other research indicates that the fiber in beans like garbanzo’s actually keep your body from absorbing carcinogens. When you take in fewer carcinogens, the less damage is done to your cells, tissues, and other organs. Less damage equates to lower cancer risk in the long run. It’s too bad that the same cannot be said for ingesting flesh foods.

Beans contain phytochemicals, which naturally fight cancer and free radicals, which ruin your cells and tissues through oxidation. The phytochemicals neutralize the free radicals before they do damage.

Greek researchers tested extracts from 11 different legumes (beans are legumes) and found that all of them neutralized free radicals. Not only that, but most of them also protected DNA from oxidative damage, which more or less explains the key to beans’ anti-cancer potential.

What about beans helping women thwart breast cancer? In a study of 90,000 young nurses, the ones who ate beans or lentils at least twice a week were less likely to develop breast cancer.

The experts assumed that the flavonols, again phytochemicals, block the free radicals, prevent oxidative damage to the cells, and encourage cancerous cells to die. All you have to do is to work at least two servings of beans and lentils into your weekly diet.

We all know there’s quite a fad about cutting carbs. If you are concerned, at all, about colon cancer, fagetaboutit.

The carbs in beans are a unique kind that the body cannot digest. As such, they wind up fermenting in your colon, thanks to the bacteria living in your gut. The fermentation produces a compound called butyrate that basically squashes inflammation and the abnormal cell growth that can lead to cancer. In addition, the indigestible carbs help give beans a low glycymic index, meaning a low risk of colon cancer. This is the super benefit of eating low glycymic index foods.

Theory leads to subjectivity. The researchers decided to put their theories to work. They took people that previously had colon polyps removed, changed their diets to include more cooked, dry beans, and after four years, those that ate the most beans were 65 percent less likely to see their polyps return.
All beans work, be it baked, pinto, kidney, navy, white, black, garbanzo, human (only kidding), or lima – all cut colon cancer risk. The more legumes that men eat the less likely they are to get prostate cancer. Three major studies found that eating lots of legumes, including beans, lentils, and split peas, dropped prostate cancer risk between 29 and 38 percent. If flesh foods are eliminated altogether, those percentages climb incredibly.

Another weapon against cancer is the folate found in B vitamins, which beans are a great source of. Eating high-folate foods reduces the risk of pancreatic and colon cancer. In addition, the folate helps to build and repair DNA. Too little leads to DNA damage and supplements will not provide the protection that folate-rich foods do.

But wait, there’s more. Bulking up with beans can help with type-2 diabetes in two ways:

1- As mentioned earlier, legumes have a lower glycemic index (GI). The GI measures how fast your blood sugar rises after eating a food. High GI foods make your blood sugar rise faster, whereas low-GI foods, like beans, cause a slower, more gradual rise. There are over 35 studies showing that diets filled with high-GI foods nearly double the risk of getting type-2 diabetes and make you 25 percent more likely to develop heart disease. High-GI foods create a spike in your blood sugar, causing your pancreas to release more insulin. So, eating high-GI foods creates a demand on your pancreas to produce more insulin. Eventually, the pancreas burns out and stops making insulin. This leads to diabetes.

2- Beans could be the single best food for weight loss. If you eat more beans despite eating more calories, you will weigh less than someone who does not eat beans and eats lower calories as well. Go figga?

If you are worried about developing type-2 diabetes, bear in mind that obesity is a major risk factor for type-2 diabetes. Not only do beans keep you slimmer, but you will get more fiber, more potassium, and you’ll eat less fat and added sugar. It’s a winning combination all across the nation.

But wait, there’s even more: high cholesterol, blood clots, insulin resistance, and oxidation all have a hand in heart problems. As an alternative to drugs and supplements, beans pit pennies against dollars.

If you took one third of a cup of black beans daily, you could cut your risk of a heart attack by 40 percent. If you ate that same one third of a cup four times a week, instead of one or none, you would be twenty two percent less likely to get heart disease.

Why would that be? Because the complex carbohydrates in beans lower the glycemic load in the meals. Then their unique combination of magnesium, copper, fiber, and alpha-linoleic acid will boost your insulin sensitivity, help prevent blood clots, and drop your risk of a heart attack. In addition, beans are an excellent source of protein, which helps to manage your weight.

If you have high cholesterol and want to take a walk on the wild side, eating half a cup of beans daily will improve your cholesterol numbers. And, if you are healthy, and you do likewise, you should experience at least a 10 percent drop in your cholesterol as well.

Remember the talk about phenols? These same phenols may also prevent hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis) because the flavonoids in beans are natural antioxidants. As such, they work against the free radicals before they can attack cholesterol and oxidize it. That’s important because oxidized LDL cholesterol contributes to atherosclerosis. The best beans for this are black, red kidney, pinto and lentils.

Now for a treat: Brownies! Believe it or not, brownies can actually be healthy. Replace up to half the shortening with pureed cannelloni beans. That will cut away 40 percent of the fat, give you fewer calories, and taste just as good. A study was done that did this and it found that the beans did not noticeably change the yumminess, the texture, color, or tenderness of the brownies. And doing this will help you battle heart disease and type-2 diabetes while still enjoying a treat, plus save you money. Canned white beans cost 80 percent less than butter and slightly less than margarine, ounce for ounce and make a great substitute if no cannelloni’s are available. And if you want even less fat and cholesterol, use egg replacer, which also does not alter the taste

Eating beans and lentils daily balances blood sugar and prevents complications in diabetics

blood

by Jonathan Benson, staff writer 

(NaturalNews) More evidence has emerged debunking the appropriateness of a whole grain-based diet for diabetics, which mainstream health authorities often recommend as beneficial for managing the disease. A new study out of Canada reveals that regularly eating beans, lentils, and other legumes instead of grains can help effectively promote and sustain healthy blood sugar and cholesterol levels, suggesting that diet alone may be all that is needed for many diabetics to properly manage and even cure their condition.

For the study, 21 diabetics were divided up into two groups, one that was instructed to eat at least one cup a day of cooked legumes, and the other that was instructed to eat more whole wheat for its fiber content. Throughout the course of three months, each participant in both groups had his or her hemoglobin A1c levels checked, a protocol that assesses blood sugar content by measuring the amount of sugar that combines with hemoglobin to cause it to become “glycated.”

At the conclusion of the three months, the research team observed that those in the legume group experienced a modest drop in hemoglobin A1c levels from 7.4 percent to 6.9 percent. And while no drop in blood pressure was observed in the whole wheat group, those eating the extra legumes saw an average drop in systolic blood pressure from 122 to 118 points, as well as a drop in diastolic blood pressure from 72 to 69.

“Legumes are good protein sources, and proteins tend to dampen the blood glucose response and they lower blood pressure,” said Dr. David Jenkins, lead author of the study from St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, noting that eating beans was enough to help diabetics drop their hemoglobin A1c levels into the healthy 6s range. “They are also good sources of fiber and that tend to be associated with lower cholesterol.”

Since the legume group presumably also ate other foods like grains during the study, it is likely that the benefits observed were not nearly as great as they could have been if the group had eaten no grain-based foods at all. Steve Cooksey, the “Diabetes Warrior” who was targeted by the state of North Carolina for blogging about how the “Paleo” diet helped him completely cure his condition (http://www.naturalnews.com), is a great example of how a no-grain diet rich in healthy proteins can literally reverse diabetes.

“The public should be doing some preventive strategies using these foods,” Dr. Jenkins added about his research. “We are not introducing some novel ‘Frankenfood’ into the diet — this is really deep, traditional stuff.”

Six of the best foods for diabetics

by PF Louis 

(NaturalNews) There are two forms of diabetes: Type one and type two. Both types involve imbalanced blood sugar and insulin issues. Insulin is the hormone that helps convert glucose into the cellular energy that’s needed for the cells to metabolize nutrients.

Type one diabetes is sometimes called juvenile diabetes because it usually occurs early in life. The pancreas doesn’t produce any or enough insulin and usually needs to be supplied externally.

That often means insulin injections by manual syringe, or an easier managed insulin injection pen, insulin pills, or a portable insulin pump.

The pancreas is usually functioning with type two diabetes, which normally occurs later in life. However, the body is insulin resistant, or not using the insulin well enough. Type two diabetes can often be controlled by exercise and diet while monitoring blood sugar.

Again, chronically high blood sugar is an indicator for both types of diabetes. But sometimes low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) occurs, especially with type two diabetes.

Many diabetic symptoms cross over with adrenal and thyroid issues as well as fibromyalgia. So it’s best to get your blood sugar tested to determine whether or not your health problems are diabetes related.

Foods for diabetics

Obviously, foods with high glycemic indexes (GI) need to be avoided. Those include refined starches and carbohydrates, sugar, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) honey, maple syrup, candies, cakes, and cookies. Synthetic sugar substitutes cook your brain cells.

Unsweetened fruit juices are short-term solutions for low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), but should be avoided unless diluted if one suffers from high blood sugar.

Did you know that many foods from fast food restaurants and processed foods off the shelf contain sugars even if they’re not meant to be sweet? Avoid them all. Buy bulk organic as much as possible.

(1) Veggies, especially greens, are items you can eat every day. Steamed veggies and raw salads are nutritionally beneficial for anyone and certainly if you have a low glycemic index.

Off-the-shelf salad dressings often contain sugar or other sweeteners. Use only unprocessed cold-pressed virgin vegetable oils, except soy, and vinegar or lemon/lime.

(2) Slice some avocado into your salad for taste variety and good nutrition. Avocados have low GIs. Avocados’ high omega-3 content contributes to healing chronic inflammation, which is often associated with diabetes; leading to other serious diseases.

Avocados are an excellent plant source of protein. (http://www.naturalnews.com/029864_avocados_health.html)

(3) Walnuts are also a good low GI source of omega-3. You can sprinkle them onto salads or veggies for a tasty change. Most other unsalted, raw nuts are also okay for diabetics. (http://www.naturalnews.com/032772_walnuts_omega-3s.html)

(4) Fresh wild (not farmed) fish, especially tuna or cold water salmon, are another high source of omega-3 with very low GI levels. All other meats are low GI high protein sources, if you are so inclined.

Then try to stick with grazing grass-fed livestock or poultry that’s free range, both to stem the excessive animal cruelty and avoid consuming the toxic antibiotics and hormones injected into factory farm animals.

(5) Grains are tricky. Obviously avoiding processed grains is necessary. But some whole grains have a higher GI (glycemic index) than you would think. Whole wheat is one of them. Quinoa and buckwheat are good substitutes. (http://www.naturalnews.com/036845_wheat_belly_weight_gain_gluten.html)

Organic brown rice may work for some diabetics since it is a complex carbohydrate that doesn’t convert to glucose rapidly. But most experts recommend diabetics not make brown rice an everyday meal.

(6) Various legumes (beans) can be added to a dish of brown rice for a delicious entree. Beans are high protein and fiber with lower GIs than potatoes. They can also be mixed in with veggies or prepared as a side dish. (http://www.naturalnews.com/025175_cancer_WHO_risk.html)

Sources for this article include:

http://www.ehow.com/about_5372662_safe-foods-diabetics.html

10 Best Foods For Your Buck

Plan your menus around healthy, nutrient-packed staples that won’t give you sticker shock at the checkout.
Make the most of your grocery budget by stocking up on these versatile natural foods that are good for your health and wallet.

Peanut butter

Why it’s a 10 best:This popular pantry item offers protein and heart-healthy unsaturated fats.
 Use it it: Snacks, sandwiches, sauces, and baking goods. 
 Cost: About 20¢ for 2 tablespoons


Eggs

Why they’re a 10 best: Eggs are a good source of lean protein, and also contain vitamin B12, riboflavin and phosphorus.

Use them in: Omelets, frittatas and salads
Cost: About 13¢ per large egg

Oats

Why they’re a 20 best: This grain helps lower LDL (bad) cholesterol.
Use them in:  Baked goods, breakfast and to stretch ground-meat dishes
Cost: About 17¢ per ½ cup for quick-cooking oats

Apples

Why they’re a 10 best: This fruit is a good source of vitamin C and is full of both soluble and insoluble fiber.
Use them in: Salads and baked goods; as a snack
Cost: About 60¢ each, depending on variety and season

Spinach


Why it’s a 10 best: This leafy green is loaded with vitamins (A, C, K and folic acid) and manganese.
Use it in: Salads, pasta dishes, casseroles, soups and stews
Cost: About $1 for 5 ounces of fresh spinach

Beans

Why they’re a 10 best: This tasty staple provides lean protein that’s full of fiber, calcium, folic acid and iron and other minerals.
Use them in: Salad and stews
Cost:  About 35¢ per ½-cup serving (canned)

Frozen vegetables


Why they’re a 10 best: They provide fiber and an array of nutrients, depending on which veggies you buy.
Use them in: Sides and casseroles
Cost: About 40¢ per serving

Sweet potatoes

Why they’re a 10 best: These spuds are very filling (because they contain fiber) and a source of vitamins A and B6.
Use them in: Main and side dishes
Cost: About $1 each

Brown rice

Why it’s a 10 best: Brown rice is a whole grain and a source of vitamin B6, magnesium, copper, zinc and manganese.
Use it in: Soups, salads and side dishes
Cost: About 37¢ per ½ cup (cooked)

Canned tuna fish

Why it’s a 10 Best: This fish is a healthful lean protein and contains omega-3 fatty acids.
Use it in: Sandwiches, casseroles and salads
Cost: About 75¢ for 3 ounces

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