Category Archives: carotenoids

Astaxanthin one of the most neuroprotective supplements yet discovered; fat-soluble carotenoids protect the nervous system, brain and eyes


by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, NaturalNews Editor 

(NaturalNews) Over the past several years, astaxanthin has earned a reputation as one of the most potent and powerful nutritional supplements ever made. I first began spreading the word about astaxanthin in 2004 when I toured the BioAstin production farm in Hawaii and published a series of articles and interviews about it (http://www.naturalnews.com/astaxanthin.html). Since then, astaxanthin has become increasingly famous, being promoted by other natural health websites and, more recently, a national infomercial campaign run by another company.

Briefly stated, astaxanthin is a fat-soluble antioxidant with neuroprotective support. It has been extensively studied in clinical trials, and its manufacturer is able to make several qualified health support statements under existing FDA regulations, including*:

• May help protect the brain from abnormal neurological function.
• May help reduce the proliferation of breast cancer tumor cells.
• May help reduce inflammation in joints and tissues.
• Helps support increased muscle recovery and stamina.
• May help protect the body from cellular damage associated with highly oxidative foods.
• May help prevent UV damage to the eyes.
• May help the skin resist UV damage from excessive sunlight exposure.

Astaxanthin is used by endurance athletes, professional fighters, exercise enthusiasts and others who seek a competitive edge.

The Health Ranger’s personal experience with astaxanthin

I have personally used astaxanthin since 2004. It was a crucial part of my dietary supplementation during my years in hand-to-hand combat training, where even at age 38 I was out-lasting the 19-year-old kids in class. These days, I spend more time working on the ranch with a chain saw or hauling bags of feed to the chickens, and I take astaxanthin every day along with a high-quality fish oil supplement from Living Fuel (www.LivingFuel.com). Because astaxanthin is fat soluble, it works better when you take it with a fish oil supplement. The combination is extremely powerful from a nutritional science point of view.

I credit astaxanthin with protecting my brain function, helping me stay mentally sharp and also keeping my physical endurance high. It’s not unusual for me to walk 4-5 miles a day, and I sometimes do that while fasting for 24 hours, as I’m into intermittent fasting. In fact, yesterday I fasted all day while I was clearing brush, removing barbed wire, chain-sawing some fallen trees, and doing other basic farm work. Most people would have considered it a day of “hard work” and couldn’t imagine doing it on an empty stomach. But I did it fasting all day long, drinking only Roobios tea in the morning and taking some astaxanthin and fish oils the night before.

The Health Ranger’s top 3 nutritional supplements

If you want to stay alive and healthy while helping prevent chronic degenerative health conditions, there are THREE powerful supplements that I consistently recommend:

#1 – Vitamin D3. This is the single most important nutrient you can buy and consume. It alone can help prevent cancer, boost brain function, help prevent diabetes, prevent osteoporosis, protect heart health, protect mood and brain function, and much more. Nearly everyone is chronically deficient in vitamin D3.

#2 – Astaxanthin. As described here, this is the “king of carotenoids.” Simply the most powerful antioxidant known to modern science. It’s what turns the flesh of salmon bright red (and is believed to help grant them their phenomenal endurance while swimming upstream). (See available sources, below.)

#3 – Fish oil or marine oil (rich in omega-3s). This is crucial. A high-quality fish oil supplement boosts mood and brain function, prevents heart disease, improves skin health, and can even help lower high blood pressure by making your blood flow more easily. Some good providers include Nordic Naturals and Carlson Labs.

If you were to take only these three supplements and nothing else, you would very likely experience a profound difference in your health. In fact, if we wanted to turn America into a nation of healthy, intelligent people with genius children and highly productive senior citizens, we would want to hand out vitamin D, astaxanthin and fish oil supplements to everybody. It could literally revolutionize the future of any nation!

Of course, other nutrients are important such as vitamin C, magnesium, zinc and so on, but it has long been my belief that these top three (vitamin D, astaxanthin, fish oil) deliver the most profound positive results that people really notice and feel.

In other words, if you have not yet tried taking these three supplements every day for 30 days, you will, I think, be amazed at the difference they make. In fact, I urge you to do so.

Recommended sources for these top three supplements

Best Vitamin D3 supplement: Solgar Viamin D3 10,000 IU. This is a high-dose vitamin D in a softgel. It’s not vegan, however. But I like the small size and the high dose of D. I usually take one of these each day unless I’m getting a lot of sunlight, in which case I may skip the supplement.

Best fish oil: LivingFuel Super Essentials Omega-3 from www.LivingFuel.com – It’s a bit pricey but I trust the quality, and it naturally contains some vitamin D by itself. I also like Carlson Labs as a source for fish oils. Beware of cheap “big box store” brands of fish oils, as they are often loaded with dangerous chemicals such as methylparabens. Read the ingredients labels to check…

Best astaxanthin: The new 12mg astaxanthin now offered through the NaturalNews marketplace (see below). A smaller, more affordable 4mg size is also available. 4mg is considered by many to be more than enough for a daily dose, but I take 12mg personally.

12mg astaxanthin now available

After producing the 4mg size of astaxanthin for over 10 years, the BioAstin company (Cyanotech) has now made a 12mg size available. This 300% increase in the dosage is in response to the community of athletes, exercise advocate and professional trainers, fitness gurus and even military soldiers who wanted a higher dose of astaxanthin in the same size capsule.

Here are the NaturalNews approved partners that offer astaxanthin. This is a real-time list showing current prices and availability. Note, our newest partner, the “Superfood Nutrition Alliance” is a new California-based non-profit that offers nutritional supplements at low prices, then directs a portion of its revenues to donate superfood to U.S. veterans and active duty soldiers.



Astaxanthin is a powerful carotenoid, one of my top three supplements of all time, and an incredible value that will not be repeated. Take advantage of this now while supplies last.

Note: This is not a vegan supplement. The capsule is made with gelatin. The oil carrier inside the capsule is safflower oil. It is a relatively small capsule compared to fish oil capsules.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the FDA, and this product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Eat tomatoes, avoid a stroke?

stroke

by Katie Brind”Amour 

(NaturalNews) According to Finnish researchers, a diet rich in carotenoids such as lycopene and beta-carotene may significantly lower the risk of stroke for men. Higher concentrations of carotenoids in the blood were associated with as much as a 55-59 percent decrease in the likelihood of having a stroke during the 12-year study of over 1,000 Finnish men aged 46-65.

Fruit and vegetable consumption and carotenoid concentration in the blood has gradually been gaining a positive reputation in maintaining cardiovascular health. Lycopene (commonly found in tomatoes and watermelon) and beta-carotene (which can be found in carrots, pumpkin, and spinach) are two of the chief carotenoids believed to help in the prevention of stroke.

The magic of carotenoids

Carotenoids have numerous preventive effects. They have been renowned for their ability to help prevent lung and prostate cancer, and their antioxidant properties may be responsible for preventing the build-up of plaque in the arteries, which is a crucial contributor to heart disease and stroke.

These benefits may arise as much from the general diet and lifestyle that accompany the consumption of large amounts of carotenoid-containing vegetables. Because of this, scientists are unable to draw a causal connection between carotenoids and stroke. The research is promising; however, and researchers and public health advocates alike are eager to point to results of studies like this to encourage a well-rounded, veggie-heavy diet.

The highest concentrations of carotenoids can be found in fruits and vegetables with red, orange, and yellow skins or flesh. Heavy hitters include tomato paste, sweet potatoes, carrot juice, papayas, citrus fruits, and leafy greens. Aim for at least five servings of fruits and vegetables each day, and eat carotenoid-containing foods with a source of fat to help your body absorb the nutrients properly.

Supplements may also be effective, although fewer studies have demonstrated a strong connection between carotenoid pills and improved cardiovascular health. Most physicians recognize the value of these amazing antioxidants but also recommend a varied, nutritious diet and regular physical activity as the best way to promote cardiovascular health.

In addition, although the study did not extend to women or young individuals, researchers expect that a diet high in carotenoids and fruits and vegetables will hold similar preventive effects for the general population.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22494809
http://www.healthline.com
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu

About the author:
Katie Brind”Amour is a Certified Health Education Specialist and passionate health and wellness freelance writer. She enjoys cooking, yoga, gardening, searching for the perfect wine and chocolate combination, and spending time with friends. She has a Masters in Biology and is currently pursuing her PhD in Health Services Management and Policy.

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