Category Archives: fermented foods

Six foods for a happy belly

by PF Louis 

(NaturalNews) What is a happy belly? Well, an unhappy belly will produce flatulence, bloating, nausea, cramps, and so called heartburn. You should be able to digest foods without any hassles, providing you don’t overeat. That’s a happy belly.

Considering that digestion begins in the mouth, it’s wise to chew your food thoroughly. In addition to reducing the food into smaller, easier to digest pieces, the saliva from chewing produces more digestive enzymes early in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

It’s also important to take your time and relax while eating. Rushed eating while stressed or hassled in any way will result in digestive stress that can create a very unhappy belly while depriving you of the food’s nutritional value.

Foods and beverages to help your belly’s happiness

As usual, organic food sources are the best choices. If you can purchase reliably clean raw milk for milk kefir, do so. Always use purified fluoride-free water.

Reverse osmosis is the best accessible system. Stations are available for filling containers in larger food markets. Make sure to re-mineralize with sea salt or some other mineral solution.

(1) Fermented foods provide probiotics that aid digestion and more. Having an intestinal flora microbial balance of 80 percent to 20 percent healthy bacteria to pathogenic bacteria is vital for even more than good digestion. It’s an important part of our immune system.

Without a well balanced intestinal flora stocked heavily with an abundance of healthy bacteria, Candida overgrowth is given a nice breeding ground. (http://www.naturalnews.com)

Fermented foods include sauerkraut, yogurt (unflavored and unsweetened) kimchi, miso, pickles, and tempeh or fermented soy, which is the only soy that’s consumable without digestive issues.

You can always add good honey or maple syrup to plain yogurts. Yes, you can make your own sauerkraut. (http://www.naturalnews.com/034788_sauerkraut_probiotics_recipes.html)

If you can get a good sourdough bread baked with sprouted grains without using bromide, that’s good for making your belly happy too. Sourdough is fermented. Sprouted grains reduce gluten’s harmful effects. Bromides block the enzyme that helps your thyroid produce adequate hormones for metabolism.

(2) Probiotic beverages can be as potent as some probiotic supplements, and a lot cheaper. Kombucha is a popular item that offers the same probiotic potential as fermented foods. Even more powerful are water and milk kefirs. You need starter grains specific to either purified water or milk, best to find raw milk.

Then you can make your own. (http://www.naturalnews.com/036419_probiotics_immunity_bacteria.html)

A woman who cured her really bad case of colitis with milk kefir showed this author how to make it. She didn’t even use raw milk, which is recommended. Here’s a good source for milk kefir starter grains with excellent instructions. (http://kefirlady.com/)

There are also several DIY kefir YouTube videos online.

(3) Prebiotic foods are essential for helping the healthy bacteria from probiotics flourish. They don’t contain healthy probiotic bacteria, but they provide the food energy to help probiotics maintain a GI tract stronghold.

Bananas, berries, artichokes, garlic, honey, legumes (beans) and whole grains such as brown rice are good prebiotic food sources.

(4) Apple cider vinegar is regarded as an excellent digestive aid by many alternative practitioners and nutritionists, but not so much by MDs and mainstream dieticians.

Us an apple cider vinegar that has not been pasteurized or filtered for best results. Before each meal, one or two tablespoons downed in a half glass of water can be beneficial. Water with meals should be room temperature for optimum digestion.

(5) When your stomach becomes unhappy, stay away from the Tums and try something healthier. Ginger root is one such choice. Only a few dare chew on a ginger root. It’s usually converted into a tea by peeling the root and cutting it into thin slices.

Make enough thin slices to cover the bottom of a pan, fill the pan with good non-fluoridated water from reverse osmosis. Simmer for 30 minutes after boiling. It can be refrigerated for several days. Ginger has been known to remedy queasy or cramping stomachs, and it’s good for general inflammation as well.

(6)The king of natural GI tract and stomach disorders is Aloe vera juice. Aloe vera juice needs to be shopped wisely. The cheap adulterated ones with preservatives or pasteurized stuff won’t cut it. Get only pure, whole unpasteurized aloe vera juice. Yes it’s pricier, but worth it.

Stomach ulcer sufferers swear by it. There have been many, many reports of Celiac disease and Crohn’s disease sufferers curing themselves with aloe vera juice, as well as some experiencing irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

With a disease as intense as Celiac, Crohn’s or IBS, it takes several days to a few weeks of daily use to get results. (http://www.naturalnews.com/021858_aloe_vera_gel.html#ixzz25fIbagIM)

Pure aloe vera juice has many, many other curative capabilities and health benefits. It has been clinically tested successfully on AIDS and cancer patients. (http://www.naturalnews.com/034738_aloe_vera_cancer_AIDS.html)

The digestive system 101: Here’s how it really works (and how to keep it healthy)

(NaturalNews) Health begins in the gut has been a central theme of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Ayurvedic health principles. This includes the complete digestive system, with special emphasis on the spleen and liver in both ancient traditions.

The whole cycle of digestion and nutrient absorption, from chewing to bowel elimination, should take 24 hours more or less depending on what’s been eaten.

More time indicates a sluggish metabolism with foods, especially meats, putrefying in the gut and/or constipation; while less time indicates not enough nutrients are being absorbed.

A simple test with beets can reveal how long your digestive cycle is. Eliminating beets’ creates a red stool. Eat beets and see how long it takes for you to produce a red stool.

Of course, there are other phases and contributing organs involved with digestion.

From mouth to stomach

As you become aware of the food visually or by smell, the brain signals glands to begin secreting juices into saliva. The saliva and juices are intensified as you chew, and the saliva contains enzymes that begin working on removing nutrients from the food.

This is why many recommend chewing slowly and more often than usual.

As the saliva moistened food slides down the throat, it comes to a fork in the road. One fork is the trachea, which connects to the bronchial and lung area. The other is the esophagus leading into the stomach.

The act of swallowing closes a flap over the trachea and opens the upper esophageal sphincter allowing the food to bypass the airway and enter the esophagus to the stomach.

The esophagus undergoes contractions to push food down to the lower esophageal sphincter, which opens to let the food into the stomach and shuts to prevent stomach acids from coming up that creates acid reflux (heartburn).

The stomach secrets acid enzymes while mucous protects the inner walls. The walls churn to mix the acid and food, creating a liquid or pasty solution, depending on the food type, which the small intestine can handle.

Through the small intestine and beyond

The small intestine is small in circumference only. It’s estimated that the surface area of the small intestine could cover a tennis court. It fits in the body because there are many folds containing villi.

Villi are tiny projections containing smaller micro-villi that pull nutrients into our blood streams with the help of liver and spleen activity.

The liver and gall bladder contribute fat emulsifying bile into the small intestines and the spleen contributes more enzymes to support the absence of food enzymes. Enzymes are active proteins that break down food into absorbable nutrients.

The first part of the small intestine, the duodenum, receives the enzyme and bile mixture. Intestinal contractions ensure this mix is exposed to the various villi to absorb the nutrients. The remaining mixture arrives into the large intestine, which is shorter with more circumference.

The large intestine has three phases for creating waste, which arrives into the colon where a bacteria colony awaits to finalize fermentation and fiber extraction.

Mucous is created within this process to help slide the stuff along, then the waste is ready for eliminating with a bowel movement.

Keeping your digestive system working well

Consume fermented foods or beverages or add probioitic supplements. (http://www.naturalnews.com/036419_probiotics_immunity_bacteria.html)

Avoid pasteurized foods and beverages that destroy enzymes. Eat raw veggies and fruits or juice often to take in more digestive enzymes. Add full spectrum enzyme supplements to your diet.

Focus on the middle section of this lengthy article: (http://www.naturalnews.com/022715.html)

Avoid processed and junk foods, especially HFCS spiked foods and beverages and processed cooking or salad oils. Consume organic whole foods. (http://www.naturalnews.com/Index-SpecialReports.html)

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/036811_digestive_system_explanation_stomach.html#ixzz23dRA4CW0

Inflammation is the cause of nearly all disease – Here’s how to prevent it

Inflammation is the cause of nearly all disease – Here’s how to prevent it

by Jonathan Benson, staff writer 

(NaturalNews) Persistent, systemic inflammation is at the root of practically all known chronic health conditions, including everything from rheumatoid arthritis and high cholesterol to dementia and cancer. These conditions are not necessarily inevitable, and neither is chronic inflammation, but you have to know what lifestyle and dietary steps to take in order to avoid them, many of which are fairly simple and straightforward.

There are literally hundreds of illnesses caused by chronic inflammation that modern medicine has classified as unique and unrelated, when in fact they are all products of the same underlying imbalances inside the body. When the root causes of these imbalances are properly addressed, in other words, chronic illness in general stands a far less chance of taking hold than if left to run its natural course.

“Inflammation is your body’s response to stress — whether from your diet, lifestyle or environment,” says a 2006 article by Body Ecology. “Think of what happens when you catch a cold. You may experience inflammation in the form of a fever as your body heats up to eradicate the effects of the invading virus.”

“This kind of inflammation is good, but the modern epidemic of chronic, low-grade inflammation destroys the balance in your body. When your body’s systems experience a constant inflammatory response, you become more susceptible to aging and disease.”

And what are some of the primary causes of chronic inflammation? Excessive stress, poor diet that lacks vitamins and minerals, environmental toxicity, not drinking enough clean water, lack of sleep, and lack of exercise all contribute to low levels of chronic inflammation that often go undetected for many years until disease finally emerges.

The Standard American Diet (SAD), which is high in simple carbohydrates and refined sugars, is another major contributor to disease-causing inflammation, as is lack of natural sunlight exposure and routine inactivity. Failing to consume enough cleansing foods as part of a normal diet is another contributing factor to chronic inflammation, as cells and blood must be continually purified with the help of nutrient-dense foods and herbs in order to prevent a chronic inflammatory response.

How to fight chronic inflammation and prevent disease

So what can you do to help avoid chronic inflammation and resultant disease? Here are a few simple guidelines:

• Drink plenty of clean, fluoride-free water – Pure, mineral-rich water is the most basic, yet one of the most powerful, anti-inflammatory nutrient that you can feed your body. Drinking naturally high-pH water from mineral sources will not only help to alkalize your body, which will prevent disease from taking hold, but will also purify your blood and cleanse toxins from the body.

• Eat plenty of fermented foods – Kombucha tea, kefir, sauerkraut, yogurt, fermented vegetables, and apple cider vinegar are all excellent examples of probiotic-rich superfoods that will help to populate your gut with beneficial bacteria, and ensure that your digestive tract remains healthy and well-functioning. Fermented foods and beverages also help prevent harmful pathogens from taking hold within the body.

• Cut out the carbs and omega-6 oils, and eat plenty of healthy, saturated fats – The average American doctor would probably cringe at this advice, but saturated fats like those found in butter and fat from grass-fed animals, as well as in coconut and palm oils, are actually beneficial for your health, while carbohydrates and oils rich in omega-6 fatty acids are heavy promoters of disease-causing inflammation. Your best bet is to skip the low-fat diet and start eating more healthy fats in combination with mineral and enzyme-rich whole foods.

• Get plenty of natural sunlight exposure – The vitamin D hormone plays a critical role in regulating immune function, as well as preventing the onset of chronic illness. A powerful, natural anti-inflammatory, vitamin D is easily accessible through natural sunlight exposure or supplementation, and it is one of the most powerful interventions for deterring inflammation.

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