Category Archives: Ginger

Reduce your cancer risk – especially colorectal – by eating more ginger

ginger

by PF Louis 

(NaturalNews) Ginger is one of Ayurveda’s favorite medicinal and tonic herbs, and it has emerged also as a culinary favorite lately. There has been considerable clinical testing by modern Western medicine that shows ginger’s anti-inflammatory effects.

Now, there’s been a small trial that points to ginger’s capacity for inhibiting and preventing cancer. The trial was performed on 20 subjects who were considered high risk for colorectal cancer.

Colorectal cancer is cancer of the colon or rectum. It is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer, and it is the second most lethal. The cancer industry asserts that early detection leads to possibly thwarting the death sentence.

They insist on screening often from age 50. Screening may include removed polyp biopsies or colonoscopies and CT Scans. Then comes the cut (surgery) and poison (chemotherapy). Chris Wark of Memphis, Tennessee was diagnosed with stage three colon cancer at the young age of 26.

He underwent surgery, but refused chemotherapy. A book literally laid on his doorstep led him into a strict raw vegan and juicing diet with supplements and herbs, which was modified a few months later by a local naturopath.

He’s in his mid-30s now, married with two kids, and still cancer free. He loves to post alternative cancer cure stories on his website – Chris beat cancer. (http://www.chrisbeatcancer.com/)

That ginger cancer prevention trial

The pilot trial was conducted at Atlanta, Georgia’s Emory University. It was published in the National Institute of Health’s (NIH)PubMed as “Effects of Ginger Supplementation on Cell Cycle Biomarkers in the Normal-Appearing Colonic Mucosa: Results from a Pilot, Randomized, Controlled Trial.”

The usual division of placebo and test subjects divided the group of 20 individuals considered high risk for colorectal cancer into two groups of 10 each. This double blind study approach is a rather cruel hoax for the placebo subjects while using non-toxic medicines.

But they insist on this protocol and others that torture animals so they can accept it as evidence based research.

The 10 lucky subjects were given two grams of ginger a day for 28 days. State of the art diagnostic testing was utilized to observe various markers on all 20 subjects detrimental to cancer forming. They examined biopsies of rectal mucosa and epithelium (thin tissue layer) crypts (tiny pockets) from both groups.

After the 28 days, biopsy markers for those who were taking two grams of ginger daily were markedly better than the placebo group.

The researchers concluded: “… ginger may reduce proliferation in the normal-appearing colorectal epithelium and increase apoptosis [cancer cell death] and differentiation relative to proliferation … [to] support a larger study to further investigate these results.”

In other words, you can use ginger to help keep cancer away, especially colorectal cancer.

Suggestions for consuming ginger

You can purchase ginger capsules, or use ginger powder to make your own and/or sprinkle onto foods. Two grams doesn’t amount to much, especially if you use it for teas, beverages, or with food.

You can purchase ginger root from most health food stores. Ginger root is not among the top “dirty dozen” of most pesticide sprayed foods. So don’t worry if organic ginger root is not within your budget.

Peel the skin off ginger roots just before using them. If you juice with a masticating juicer, you can drop a couple inches of the root into your juicer along with other veggies and apples. It spices things up and supplies a large dose of cancer preventing ginger.

For ginger tea, it’s best to use the traditional method of covering the bottom of a pan with thin slices of peeled ginger root, bringing it to a boil then letting it simmer for a half-hour. Whatever you don’t drink can be stored in the fridge for a few days.

Six reasons to never leave home without ginger

by Jonathan Benson, staff writer 

(NaturalNews) The amazing abilities of the ginger plant to promote vibrant health and prevent disease cannot be overstated, especially because of how easy it is to consume both ginger root and leaves on a daily basis in the form of capsules, tea, extract, soft chews, and even slices or pieces added to various foods. Here are six specific reasons why you should make ginger a part of your everyday health regimen:

1. Ginger helps treat colds, respiratory ailments. As highlighted in a 1993 study published in the journal Economic Botany, ginger is a powerful expectorant, which means it triggers the body to produce more hydration secretions for the purpose of lubricating the respiratory tract. Ginger helps thin bronchial mucus in order to clear up clogged airways, which in turn improves breathing and lung capacity. (http://www.springerlink.com/content/j312643x38882260/)

When treating a cough or cold with ginger, you can experience almost immediate relief by either combining it with tamarind leaves and brewing it in hot water, crushing and mixing it fresh with honey, or boiling it along with fenugreek seeds and mixing it with ginger rhizome juice. Dr. Deepak Acharya lists three proven ginger recipes for instant cough and cold relief in a recent report he authored atGreenMedInfo.comhttp://www.greenmedinfo.com

2. Ginger helps treat stomach aches, indigestion, and nausea. Perhaps its most well-known medicinal proper, ginger’s ability to quell upset stomach, indigestion, and nausea rivals that of many antacids and antihistamines. Numerous studies and user experiences have shown that ginger is a powerful remedy for motion sickness, morning sickness, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and indigestion. (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/961.html)

Dissolving roughly one gram of ginger powder in boiling water or another hot beverage is a simple way to prevent or alleviate indigestion and stomach aches. Even eating a soft ginger chew candy or two prior to riding the bus, going sailing, or engaging in another type of activity that would otherwise induce nausea, is often enough to prevent nausea symptoms from ever forming. (http://www.naturalnews.com/034934_ginger_root_nausea_vomiting.html)

3. Ginger targets headaches, migraines. Many people suffer from chronic headaches and migraines, for which few effective remedies exist outside of potentially dangerous pharmaceutical drugs. But ginger’s anti-inflammatory properties are believed to be the mechanism by which this powerful herb effectively fights chronic head pain, making it an absolute necessity when traveling, working, or engaging in other activities that may trigger a headache.

Keeping a box of ginger tea in your purse or car, or carrying around a small bottle or pouch of ginger pills, will ensure that you have quick access to ginger as an effective pain reliever. Dr. Acharya also recommends creating a ginger paste out of dried ginger powder and water, and applying it to the forehead for immediate relief. (http://www.doctoroz.com/videos/all-natural-headache-cures)

4) Ginger helps relieve joint, muscle pain. Like it does with headaches, ginger can also help to relieve joint and muscle pain due to its powerful anti-inflammatory effect. Taking a few grams of ginger root powder, extract, or capsules daily can help significantly reduce joint and muscle pain, as well as symptoms associated with arthritis, according to a 2001 study published in the journal Arthritis and Rheumatism. (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/1665874.stm)

Ginger root powder can also be ground up and mixed with Castor (Ricinus communis) root and applied topically to the skin covering painful joints, according to Dr. Acharya. (http://www.greenmedinfo.com)

5. Ginger helps clear out intestinal worms, parasites. If you suffer from chronic digestive pain or irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), there is a chance the source of this discomfort is intestinal worms or parasites, which may also be stealing nutrients from the foods you eat. If this is the case, a great way to naturally rid yourself of these foreign invaders is to supplement with ginger.

A plethora of research confirms that ginger possesses unique anthelmintic effects, which means it is capable of destroying parasitic intestinal worms. It is believed that ginger’s array of powerful enzymes combined with its stimulatory capacity make it an effective treatment for parasites, whether taken as a supplement or as a tea. (http://www.curezone.org/forums/am.asp?i=479834)

6. Ginger helps promote kidney health, dissolve urinary stones. Since it acts as a warming, circulatory stimulant, ginger can help cleanse the body of harmful toxins, including those that build up in the kidneys. Particularly in people with diabetes, ginger helps protect the kidneys against diabetic nephropathy, or deterioration of normal kidney function. (http://tribune.com.ng)

The mechanisms by which ginger stimulates proper kidney function are also linked to promoting healthy liver function and blood flow. In the former, ginger assists the body in converting cholesterol into bile acids. In the latter, ginger helps prevent blood platelets from sticking together, which can cause coagulation and eventually harmful blood clots if left unaddressed. (http://www.vrp.com)

Sources for this article include:

http://www.greenmedinfo.com

Seven ways that taking ginger can spice up your health


by Jonathan Benson, staff writer 

(NaturalNews) Cultivated and used medicinally for thousands of years all around the world, ginger root is a powerful medicinal herb that offers a variety of unique health benefits. When taken regularly in therapeutic doses, ginger root can effectively cure nausea; promote healthy digestion; boost immunity; treat asthma; improve cardiovascular function and heart health; relieve pain; and even prevent and cure chronic disease by quelling inflammation.

Besides being widely known for the exotic, spicy flavor it adds to food and beverages, one of ginger’s other main claims to fame is its amazing ability to 1) improve digestion and promote better assimilation of nutrients into the body. A plethora of scientific research conducted throughout the past several decades confirms that ginger contains a distinct enzymatic profile that works synergistically to promote healthy digestion, and ease the processing of food in the stomach and intestines. (http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/ginger-000246.htm)

“The ‘quintessential digestive herb,’ ginger has the ability to restore digestive balance as in the cases of ulcers, parasites or nausea; the anti-emetic effects of ginger are therapeutic in cases of motion sickness, morning sickness, and other kinds of nausea,” writes Paul Schulick in his 1995 paper entitled “The Many Roles of Ginger.” “Ginger also encourages full digestive potential, and due in part to its enzyme activity, can increase bioavailability of drugs and nutrients.”

On a similar note, ginger root is a proven 2) remedy for motion sickness, seasickness, and various other forms of nausea. Pregnant women, chemotherapy patients, and individuals with mild or moderate upset stomach can all experience relief by taking therapeutic doses of ginger, which was shown in at least one major study to eliminate nausea symptoms with as little as a one-quarter of a teaspoon dose. (http://articles.cnn.com)

As quoted in the book Alternative Cures: The Most Effective Natural Home Remedies for 160 Health Problems, Dr. Robert Dozor, M.D., explains that “[g]inger in any form — as a capsule, as a tea, even as ginger candy, if it’s actually made with the herb — can quickly calm nausea” (http://www.naturalpedia.com/book_Alternative_Cures.html). This includes cancer patients who experience debilitating nausea as a result of chemotherapy treatments.

Even better than its power to eliminate post-chemotherapy nausea; however, is ginger’s amazing ability to 3) treat inflammation and boost immunity. Chronic inflammation is linked to a host of debilitating diseases, including cancer, all of which can be effectively prevented and even treated with therapeutic doses of whole ginger extract.

Numerous studies, including one that was published in the British Journal of Nutrition back in 2011, have shown that whole ginger extract effectively fights cancer cells by inducing apoptosis, a process by which cancer cells essentially “commit suicide.” In the book Cooking with Foods that Fight Cancer, authors Richard Beliveau and Denis Gingras explain how ginger’s powerful anti-inflammatory effect creates an environment within the body that precludes the growth and spread of cancer cells and resultant tumors. (http://recipes.howstuffworks.com/turmeric-ginger.htm)

This same anti-inflammatory effect also makes ginger a powerful 4) pain reliever, particularly for chronic pain conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, sciatica, and fibromyalgia. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study published in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism back in 2001, for instance, found that patients with osteoarthritis experienced dramatic pain relief when they took ginger extract twice daily. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11710709)

Ginger is also an effective treatment for milder pain symptoms associated with conditions like the occasional headache, sore muscles, and the common cold. Ginger’s unique compositional blend of analgesic substances naturally inhibits pain-producing prostaglandins from activating an inflammatory response within the body. Synthetic pain reliever drugs, on the other hand, cannot accomplish this, at least not without eliciting harmful side-effects.

“Ginger inhibits the production of immune-system components called cytokines, chemicals that create a long-term tendency toward inflammation. It also stimulates blood circulation,” writes Phyllis A. Balch, C.N.C., in her book Prescription for Herbal Healing: An Easy-to-Use A-Z Reference to Hundreds of Common Disorders and Their Herbal Remedies(http://www.naturalpedia.com/book_Prescription_for_Herbal_Healing.html). “These effects make ginger useful in treating a number of disorders marked by swelling and pain, such as arthritis.”

Speaking of circulation, ginger has been shown to greatly promote 5) cardiovascular health by suppressing the biosynthesis of an inflammatory mediator known as leukotrienes. The dual-action, anti-inflammatory nature of ginger, while it inhibits both leukotrienes and prostaglandins, it helps maintain optimal arterial flow. Ginger also prevents platelet aggregation while also stimulating the release of adrenaline, processes that both help strengthen the heart.

Another way that ginger helps prevent and cure disease is through its diverse array of 6) antioxidants, the two most prominent of which are curcumin and gingerol. Not only do these and several other free radical scavengers prevent the growth and spread of cancer cells, but they also prevent from forming, and even eliminate, amyloid plaques in the brain that are linked to causing Alzheimer’s disease and other degenerative brain conditions.

“Ginger is a source of a large number of important antioxidants that, amongst other activities, reduce lipid oxidation by enhancing the activities of crucial internally produced antioxidants, such as superoxide dismutase,” says Dr. Keith Scott, M.D., author of the book Medicinal Seasonings, the Healing Power of Spices. “Melatonin, in particular, is not only a highly effective free-radical scavenger itself, but also stimulates production of the main antioxidant enzyme of the brain, glutathione peroxidase.” (http://keithscottmd.articlealley.com)

Children and adults who suffer from asthma symptoms will also be pleased to learn that ginger is an effective 7) asthma treatment as well. Ginger naturally contains several different compounds that can help alleviate asthma symptoms. These include alpha-pinene, which loosens mucus in the bronchial tubes, and beta-carotene, the antioxidant precursor to vitamin A.

Herbs for natural medecine

30 Most Popular Herbs for Natural Medicine ~

 

Aloe Vera – Antibacterial, anti-fungal, antiviral, wound and burn healer, natural laxative, soothes stomach, helps skin disorders.

Basil – Powerful antispasmodic, antiviral, anti-infectious, antibacterial, soothes stomach.

Black Cohosh – Relieves menopausal hot flashes, relieves menstrual cramps, helps circulatory and cardiovascular disorders, lowers blood pressure, reduces cholesterol, useful for nervousness and stress. Note: Do not use during pregnancy.

Black Walnut – Good for eliminating parasites, good for fungal infections, good for warts and poison ivy, aids digestion.

Cinnamon – It has been proven that 99.9% of viruses and bacteria can not live in the presence of cinnamon. So it makes a great antibacterial and antiviral weapon.

Cayenne- Catalyst for other herbs, useful for arthritis and rheumatism (topically and internally), good for colds, flu viruses, sinus infection and sore throat, useful for headache and fever, aids organs (kidneys, heart, lungs, pancreas, spleen and stomach, increase thermogenesis for weight loss.

Clove Bud – Improves the immune system, they are also an antioxidant and doubles as an antibacterial and antimicrobial fighter.

Cypress – The therapeutic properties of cypress oil are astringent, antiseptic, antispasmodic, deodorant, diuretic, haemostatic, hepatic, styptic, sudorific, vasoconstrictor, respiratory tonic and sedative.

Dandelion – Helpful for PMS, good for menopause, increases ovarian hormones.

Echinacea (coneflower) – Boosts white blood cell production, immune system support, anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties, good for colds, flu and infection. Note: Use no more than two weeks at a time. Do not use if you are allergic to sunflowers or related species.

Eucalyptus – Anti-infectious, antibacterial and antiviral.

Garlic – Helps fight infection, detoxifies the body, enhances immunity, lowers blood fats, assists yeast infections, helps asthma, cancer, sinusitis, circulatory problems and heart conditions.

German Chamomile – Helps stress, anxiety and insomnia, good for indigestion, useful for colitis and most digestive problems, effective blood cleanser and helps increase liver function and supports the pancreas. Improves bile flow from the liver, it is good for healing of the skin that might come from a blistering chemical agent.

Geranium – Dilates bile ducts for liver detoxification, antispasmodic, stops bleeding, anti-infectious, antibacterial.

Ginger – Helps nausea, motion sickness and vomiting, useful for circulatory problems, good for indigestion, and is also an effective antioxidant.

Lavender – Assists with burns, antiseptic, used as a stress reliever, good for depression, aids skin health and beauty.

Lemon – Is known for its antiseptic properties, Essential Science Publishing says that: According to Jean Valnet, M.D. the vaporized essence of lemon can kill meningococcal bacteria in 15 minutes, typhoid bacilli in one hour, Staphylococcus aureus in two hours and Pneumococcus bacteria within three hours. Lemon also improves micro-circulation, promotes white blood cell formation, and improves immune function.

Marjoram – Anti-infectious, antibacterial, dilates blood vessels, regulates blood pressure, soothes muscles.

Marshmallow – Aids bladder infections, diuretic (helps fluid retention), helps kidney problems, soothes coughs, sore throats, indigestion, and as a topical agent it is said to be anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and wound-healing.

Melissa – Assists in issues with the nervous system, blisters, and has antimicrobial properties.

Mullein – Can be used as a laxative, good for asthma and bronchitis, useful for difficulty breathing, helps hay fever.

Myrrh – Anti-infectious, antiviral, soothes skin conditions and supports immune system. Also an antispasmodic that helps to reduce spasming due to spasms caused by nerve agents.

Oregano – is a powerful antibiotic and has been proven to be more effective in neutralizing germs than some chemical antibiotics. It has been effective against germs like Staphylococcus aureas, Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

Pine – Antidiabetic, cortisone-like, severe infections, hypertensive

Rosemary – Antiseptic, Antibacterial, Cleansing and detoxes the body. Supports the liver and combats cirrhosis.

Rosewood – Anti-infectious, antibacterial, and antiviral.

Sage – Used in anxiety, nervous disorders, as astringent, in abdominal disorders, anti inflammatory.

Spearmint – To calm the Nervous System, aide with Nerve Agents.

Tea Tree – Disinfectant, antibacterial, anti-fungal, burns, good for all skin conditions.

Thyme – Effective against Anthrax and Tuberculosis

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