Category Archives: Green tea

Green Tea Health Benefits

A cup of green tea is a good way to start your day.
“It’s the healthiest thing I can think of to drink,” says Christopher Ochner, PhD. He is a research scientist in nutrition at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “Green tea is beyond a super food.”
In the past 20 years, thousands of studies have shown green tea’s benefits.
Healthy cells
Why is green tea so good for you? “It’s all about the catechin content,” says Beth Reardon, RD, a Boston nutritionist. Catechins are antioxidants that fight and may even prevent cell damage. Green tea is not processed much before it is poured in your cup, so it is rich in catechins.
Healthy heart
Green tea has been shown to improve blood flow and lower cholesterol. A 2013 review of many studies found green tea helped prevent a range of heart-related issues, from high blood pressure to congestive heart failure.
Brain health
What’s good for the heart is usually good for the brain, and your brain needs healthy blood vessels, too. In one Swiss study, MRIs revealed that people who drank green tea had greater activity in the working-memory area of their brains.  Green tea has also been shown to help block the formation of plaques that are linked toAlzheimer’s disease.
Diabetes
Green tea seems to help keep blood sugar stable in people with diabetes. Because catechins lower cholesterol and blood pressure, they can protect against the damage a high-fat diet can cause, Ochner says.
Weight loss
Green tea can help increase and even change your metabolism, so you burn more calories from fat. Studies show that green tea can also help you keep weight off once you’ve lost it.
It’s also a smart swap for sugary drinks. “All things being equal, if you sub 1-2 cups of green tea for one can of soda, over the next year you’d save over 50,000 calories,” says Ochner. That’s more than 15 pounds.
Cancer role
Studies on green tea’s impact on cancer have been mixed.  But green tea is known to aid healthy cells in all stages of growth. There are some indications green tea may help destroy cancer cells.
Less stress
Sipping tea helps you slow down and relax, Reardon says. An amino acid called theanine found in green tea can provide a calming effect.
For a healthy cuppa:
  • Don’t add green tea to boiling water. You’ll kill helpful catechins. Better: 160-170 degree water.
  • Add lemon. Vitamin C makes the healthy compounds in green tea easier to absorb. Dairy, on the other hand, makes it harder to absorb the catechins.
  • Levels of the healthful compounds in green tea can vary. Rule of thumb: Pricier teas usually have more, and canned green-tea drinks have less.
Aim for at least four cups a day, two with caffeine and two without. Even more than that seems to have little health downside, other than the possible effects of caffeine, Ochner says. “There could not be a more simple way to improve your health,” he says.
Reviewed by David Kiefer, MDBy Paula Spencer Scott
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Rooibos: African red bush tea is even better than green tea

Rooibos: African red bush tea is even better than green tea

by Nanditha Ram 

(NaturalNews) Green tea has competition, and not just of the light kind. The word “rooibos” (roo-ee-bosh) means red bush and is a native South African herb, so rich in antioxidants, it supposedly puts green tea on the run. There is enough research and evidence to show the range of health benefits attributable to rooibos tea including reducing the risk of heart disease and inhibiting aging.

According to experts, rooibos can lay claim to antimutagenic, anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-viral properties. The anti-oxidant quercetin – also dubbed (and with good reason too) the king of anti-oxidants is what makes red bush tea an armor against various diseases and conditions. In addition to quercetin, rooibos also contains two lesser known, relatively rare antioxidants aspalathin and nothofagin and according to experts, both have nerve relaxing properties, with the potential to reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Conditions affecting the digestive system such as heartburn, ulcers, and constipation can be relieved by red bush tea. It’s supposed soothing effect on the nervous system makes it an ideal drink for those suffering from nervous irritability, insomnia, headaches, disturbed sleep patterns, high blood pressure and maybe even mild to moderate depression. It appears that the list of potential uses for rooibos goes even longer with it being quite ideal for skin conditions such as eczema, rash and other skin irritations.

Free radical oxygen and rooibos as an anti-oxidant

Normal cell metabolism releases free radical oxygen as a by product. These free radicals are reactive and can negatively affect body proteins and fats or even go so far into the system as the DNA itself. Free radicals cause a chain reaction of damage to the human body and this chain reaction can often be stopped or at least interrupted by anti-oxidant intake. Vitamin C, Vitamin E and carotenoids are well known anti-oxidants found variously in fruit, vegetable oils and vegetables. Flavonoids are another type of anti-oxidants and rooibos is a rich source of it.

Rooibos is also efficient, say experts, in managing asthma, hay fever, wheezing and allergic cough. It is a rich source of zinc, alpha-hydroxy acid, manganese, and naturally occurring fluoride plus magnesium for a healthy nervous system. Rooibos tea is meant to be safe for pregnant and nursing mothers, and even infants – it is a caffeine free drink and can be given to colic-suffering babies due to its anti-spasmodic effect. Wait, there is more. The absence of oxalic acid in red bush tea makes it a safe drink for people suffering kidney stones.

Rooibos looks like a herb too good to be true, yet it seems to be gaining in popularity the world over for its distinctive health-guarding properties. Perhaps, after all, a box of rooibos in the kitchen cupboard might keep us out of harms way, or better still, save us some trips to hospitals and pharmacies. At least it’s worth a try.

Resources:

http://www.sarooibos.co.za

http://www.mskcc.org

http://www1.american.edu

http://lifespantea.com

http://www.montegotea.com

http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com

Green tea plus citrus provides new level of cancer protection

by Ethan Evers 

(NaturalNews) A large study was recently carried out in Japan to assess citrus fruit consumption as a means of preventing cancer. The results were surprising: citrus fruit had a markedly lower risk for multiple cancers, but only for green tea drinkers. More importantly, daily citrus consumption provided significant protection above and beyond that obtained by drinking green tea alone.

Citrus fruit and cancer risk in Japan – The Ohsaki cohort study

The Ohsaki cohort study was carried out on over 42,000 men and women, aged 40-79, starting in 1994. Citrus fruit consumption was determined by questionnaire, and patients were followed up with from 1995 to 2003 (average follow-up period 7.6 years). During that time, 3,398 cases of cancer were identified. Eating citrus fruit every day provided no significant cancer protection for non-tea drinkers. But for those drinking at least one cup daily of green tea, the story was different. Joint effect analysis showed that men experienced an overall 17 percent reduction in cancer risk, while women saw an 18 percent reduction. Both results were statistically significant. Those consuming citrus fruit three to four times per week saw a reduced but still significant benefit of 11 percent cancer risk reduction. But the most stunning result of the Ohsaki cohort study is that green tea drinkers who added citrus fruit to their diet every day saw increased protection from cancer even beyond that from drinking green tea alone. This is important, because multiple studies have already shown that green tea consumption may significantly reduce the risk for several cancers (lung, ovarian, endometrial, prostate, liver, oral).

Citrus with green tea sharply lowers pancreatic and prostate cancer risk

When data was further analyzed for individual cancers, more impressive results emerged. Daily citrus with green tea provided a 38 percent reduction in pancreatic cancer risk for men and women, and a 37 percent risk reduction in prostate cancer for men (both statistically significant). Sizable risk reductions for other cancers were also observed (breast, renal, colorectal, esophageal, bladder) but due to the small number of cases, statistical significance was not reached for any of them.

Citrus consumption may stabilize green tea polyphenols in the gut

The researchers from the Ohsaki cohort study did not know why citrus made such a good combination with green tea, and called for further study on the matter. It is important to note that the mandarin orange is the major citrus fruit consumed by the Japanese (Japan National Nutrition Survey). There is no known synergizing compound in mandarin oranges (each contains roughly 10 mg naringenin and eight mg hesperetin, but no appreciable quercetin).

However, another way to increase green tea’s anticancer effect might be to increase absorption of its active polyphenols (especially EGCG). A recent study from Purdue University seems to confirm that this is the case. Purdue researchers showed that green tea polyphenols are quite unstable in the gut. In a simulated stomach environment, fewer than 20 percent of the total polyphenols could be recovered after digestion. However, mixing green tea with various additives changed this dramatically. Of all the additives, citrus juice was the most effective in stabilizing green tea polyphenols, raising the recovery rate to as high as 76 percent for EGCG.

So if you’re currently using green tea (drink or supplements) to ward off cancer, combining with citrus fruit could provide you with a new level of protection. And keep in mind that if citrus fruit enhances the anti-cancer effect of green tea by stabilizing it in the stomach, then it may be important to take the two with the same meal, in order to achieve the maximum benefit.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20104526
http://www.naturalnews.com/034309_green_tea_cancer_prevention.html
http://www.ars.usda.gov
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17688297

About the author:
Ethan Evers is author of the award-winning medical thriller “The Eden Prescription,” in which natural medicine outperforms a billion-dollar chemo drug and threatens the entire $50 billion cancer drug industry. Ethan based The Eden Prescription on the latest science on natural medicine for cancer, and wrote it to show the future reality that natural medicine can bring us—and to warn of the strategies now being used by those who are trying to stop it. Ethan has a PhD in Applied Science.

nutrition

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Nutrition

  • ASPIRIN – The wonder drug, also, it is believed, reduces the chance of death by cancer by inhibiting an enzyme that promotes cancer proliferation in tumours.
  • “A landmark study to be published in the June issue [2010] of the American Journal of Clinical Health provides direct evidence that refined, highly processed carbohydrates are worse for your heart than saturated fat.” Leslie Beck Globe and Mail, May 2010. Foods that do not provide a rush of insulin (low GI – under 55): “grainy breads with seeds, steel-cut oats, 100% bran cereal, brown rice, sweet potatoes, pasta, apples, citrus fruit, grapes, pears, legumes, nuts, milk, yogurt and soy milk.”
http://www.montignac.com/en/ig_recherche.php – a link for glycemic information
  • OMEGA-3: According to “studies reviewed by Dr Gomez-Pinilla (professor of neurosurgery and physiological science at UCLA), the benefits of omega-3s include improved learning and memory, and resistance to depression and bipolar sisorder, schizophrenia, dementia, attention-deficit disorder and dyslexia. Omega-3s are found in oily fish such as salmon, as well as in walnuts and kiwi fruit…” The Economist, July 19 2008
  • [vegetable] “Fats may be guarding against hip fractures” was the title of Dr Richard Beliveau’s column in the Whig on December 14 2010. “Replacing these fats [saturated, eg in red meat and in whole milk]”, Beliveau said, “with those with a vegetable origin, particularly olive oil and oils rich in polyunsaturated omega-3 (flax seeds, for example), is a simple and effective way to improve the quality of fat brought into our body, thereby contributing to the prevention of several diseases, including those affecting bone density.”
  • Vitamin D ”[I]n Scotland the sun is only strong enough to provide vitamin D between April and September. If the body’s reserves of vitamin D run out during the winter, they need to be topped up from oily fish, eggs, meat or a supplement.” BBC News Sept 2010
  • “More cinnamon, less cancer” was the title of Dr Richard Beliveau’s column of March 22, 2010. I put cinnamon along with honey on my multi-grain toast this morning. No butter! By weight, cinnamon has 25 times more more polyphenols than wild blueberries. ‘Attention on Prevention’ is the sub-title of Beliveau’s columns.
  • Pistachio nuts may help prevent your arteries from clogging, your blood vessels clean and your heart healthy and strong. Consumer Reports on Health. We use non-salted pistachio nuts. Also containing phytosterols like pistachio nuts are sunflower and pumpkin seeds, flax seeds and pine nuts.
  • Inflammation – Rosmarinic acid curbs inflammation. Rosmarinic acid can be found in rosemary, of course, and also oregano, sage, thyme, marjoram and lemon balm.
  • To be healthy we need thirty minutes of moderate-intensity exercise five times a week. According to Paul Taylors’ Globe and Mail Column on March 20 2009, moderate-intensity walking is 100 steps in 60 seconds times 30 minutes – “a brisk walk” said Dr. Marshall.
  • Raw veggies are not necessarily more nutritious was Leslie Beck’s thrust in her May 27 2009 Globe and Mail column. Tomatoes and spinach are better for you if cooked. Broccoli, kale and garlic, better raw.
  • Mental Health : “there is nothing so urgent that it cannot be postponed in favour of a cup of tea”
  • PHYTOCHEMICALS: The highest levels of anti-cancer compounds (phytochemicals) are found in greeen tea, soybeans, and tumeric. Phytochemical activity “targets the processes involves in the development of a tumour”. p.75 Foods that Fight Cancer by Beliveau and Gingras
  • GOBS + CCC + TTT – I’m trying to remember the eleven chapters in Part II of Foods that Fight Cancer: three begin with T – tumeric, tomatoes and tea (green); three with C – citrus, chocolate (dark) and cabbage; and GOBS with a silent W (actually the W is invisible) stand for: red wine, garlic (onions etc), Omega 3s, berries (blue in particular) and soy.
  • The term “whole grain” bread includes the wheat germ, but “whole wheat” may not.
  • GREEN TEA holds a place of prime importance in any diet planned with cancer prevention in mind. Of all foods, it contains one of the highest proportions of anti-cancer molecules” p.115 Cooking with Foods that Fight Cancer by Beliveau and Gingras is a terrific book. We now use Japanese gyokuro green tea as it is richer in catechins. Gyokuro is about $32 for 100 grams.
  • As soon as you cook meat at over 350 degrees, HCAs (carcinogens) are produced. Marinating before cooking is one way to reduce HCAs.
  • “We now know that monounsaturated fats can reduce the total cholesterol and the LDL while protecting the HDL, the good cholesterol.” page 33 Good Fat – Bad Fat by Louise Lambert-LaGace and Michelle LaFlamme, 1995. “Monounsaturated fats are found in plant foods such as olive oil, canola oil, hazelnuts oil, almonds, avacadoes, pistachios . . ”
  • Olive oil actually can reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease. That’s because olive oil containsphenol, an ingredient that keeps your arteries elastic. That’s important because “elastic” arteries can handle sudden changes in your blood flow –the secret of preventing a heart attack.” from the ad for Consumer Reports, ‘The Best of Health’ book
  • cod liver oil “Basiclly, if you’re taking your teaspoon full of cod liver oil, it’s fine…but higher levels are not associated with health.” Reinhold Vieth, professor, department of nutritional sciences at U of T.
  • SAGE – I now add a broken-up sage leaf or two to my soups. Sage contains essential oils, flavonoids, antioxidend enzymes and phenolic acid. Sage is supposed to enhance memory and reduce inflamation. from The Perricone Promise
  • The allium vegetables (onions, garlic, leeks, shallots) help improve blood cholesterol and fat profiles, as do spices, particularly ginger and tumeric.” Michael Vertolli
  • IRISH COFFEE – Only Irish coffee provides in a single cup all four essential food groups: alcohol, caffeine, sugar and fat.

How long does OJ keep before it loses vitamins?

Since we’re not big juice drinkers in our house, OJ usually only makes its way into our fridge when guests come to visit. Even then, it still takes us a few weeks to polish off the carton. I never thought much about keeping the OJ for a few weeks. After all, it still tastes good—and we usually finish it before the expiration date. Then I read this study that showed opened OJ loses all antioxidant benefit after just one week! Seriously? Well, as you can imagine, this led me to wonder if other items in my kitchen lose their health punch over time. (Spoiler alert: they do!)

Keep track of how long you store these 4 items. Here’s why: certain nutrients are unstable when exposed to oxygen (from the air), heat (from cooking) and light.

Orange juice: 1 week
One cup of OJ can offer a full day’s dose of vitamin C. But OJ that has been opened loses all antioxidant benefit after just one week. To get the most vitamin C, buy frozen concentrate and drink within a few days. Frozen concentrate is exposed to less light and air. (Use your OJ before it loses its nutritional punch: make Grilled Orange Chicken Fingers and more delicious recipes with orange juice.)

Green tea: 6 months
A 2009 study in the Journal of Food Science showed that catechins (antioxidants linked with a reduced risk of some cancers) in green tea decreased markedly over time. After six months, catechin levels were 32 percent lower. Make the most of the antioxidants by storing tea in a sealed container in a dark, cool place.
(Add this 1 ingredient to your tea to make it healthier.)

Olive oil: 6 months
Extra-virgin olive oil contains more than 45 heart-healthy antioxidants, but after six months of storage their potency decreases by about 40 percent, according to researchers at the University of Foggia in Italy. Why? Oxygen bubbles in the bottle destroy the antioxidants.
(Find out which brands won our Olive Oil Taste Test and find out how to shop for the healthiest and tastiest olive oil.)

Honey: 6 months
Researchers at the University of Illinois found the antioxidant power of clover and buckwheat honey decreased by 30 to 50 percent after six months. Consider buying buckwheat honey—it generally has more antioxidants to start with.
(Can honey help you lose weight?)

By Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D.

Brierley’s interest in nutrition and food come together in her position as an associate editor at EatingWell. Brierley holds a master’s degree in Nutrition Communication from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. A Registered Dietitian, she completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Vermont.

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