Category Archives: Honey

How to lose belly fat and maintain a healthy weight with honey


by Carolanne Wright 

(NaturalNews) Believe it or not, the holiday season is almost upon us – and with it, the usual overindulgence and weight gain. But we can take action to offset the damage. Armed with a simple daily detox drink and metabolism-boosting remedies, we can keep our waistlines in check and ensure all the festivities won’t dampen health.

Effortless weight management

Honey lemon detox

Many have heard of the famous detox with lemon juice and honey that is making the rounds over the Internet. There’s a good reason the recipe is such a phenomenal success: it’s easy and it works. Even using a scaled-down version of the cleanse is beneficial for enhancing metabolism. Each morning upon waking, drink eight ounces of warm water with two tablespoons of fresh lemon juice and a teaspoon of honey. With this daily ritual, the liver is given a supportive, cleansing boost. And when the liver is functioning properly, we can sustain a healthy weight more easily.

Cinnamon with honey

As simple as it may sound, drinking a mug of warm cinnamon tea with honey is one of the best ways to balance blood sugar, spur metabolism and shed excess weight. Since abdominal fat is sensitive to the compounds in cinnamon, it’s an ideal choice if you need to slim down in this region. To make the tea, dissolve half a teaspoon of organic, ground cinnamon in a cup of boiling water. Cover and let steep for 15 minutes. Next, stir in one teaspoon of honey and enjoy immediately. For optimal results, practice this habit first thing in the morning and away from food.

Hibernation Diet

Who would have guessed that consuming honey before bedtime could melt away body fat while you sleep? According to British pharmacist Mike McInnes and his son Stuart, a nutritionist, the Hibernation Diet does just that. The duo believe that, when the liver is properly fueled with glycogen in the evening, recovery hormones can do their job during sleep – thereby speeding up metabolism and reducing fat-encouraging stress hormones. Woman’s Day magazine notes that, if you suffer from any of the following symptoms, your liver may not be properly primed with glycogen:

  • Acid reflux
  • Disrupted sleep
  • Waking to urinate
  • Dry throat in the morning
  • Night cramps and/or sweats
  • Early morning nausea and weakness
  • Exhausted upon waking


The Hibernation Diet recommends ingesting a spoonful or two of pure honey before bedtime to rev up fat utilization, soothe stress response and support nighttime muscle and tissue regeneration.

Gingered honey

Ginger tea in itself is a tremendous metabolism booster, but when combined with honey, it offers a potent elixir for efficient digestion. Drinking a glass of the tea with a teaspoon of honey twenty minutes before a meal will encourage stable blood sugar, optimum digestion and, in turn, favorable calorie utilization and fat burning. To make the tea, peel and grate a one inch chunk of fresh, organic ginger and simmer (covered) in two cups of water. Transfer to a mug and let cool until just warm. Dissolve one teaspoon of honey into the brew and drink promptly. Make sure to consume the grated ginger too for utmost benefit.

Although honey is an astoundingly versatile and beneficial food, it’s important to use discrimination when purchasing. Use only the highest quality honey – namely, one that is organic and raw with honeycomb, royal jelly, bee pollen and propolis included. Manuka honey is another excellent option, as it boasts remarkable healing properties.

Sources:

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://wakeup-world.com

http://womansday.ninemsn.com

http://www.naturalnews.com

http://www.mindbodygreen.com

Why Natural Sugars Aren’t Any Better Than Artificial Sugars (and Neither Is Paleo!)

Contributor – Nurse Practitione
I don’t know about you, but lately I’ve noticed a worrisome trend among “health food” bloggers, “paleo” Facebook pages, and other websites and sources of healthy recipes and food ideas. Everyone is going ape-crap for paleo desserts.

Why is this worrisome? Because, it seems we’re losing sight of what paleo is all about and looking for sneaky ways to have our cake and eat it too. Pun totally intended. Don’t get me wrong; I like a good cookie or brownie just as much as anyone. However, I’ve been around long enough to have seen the low-fat trend come and go and to know better than to buy into the “I can eat anything I want as long as it’s _____.” Fill that in with low fat, gluten-free, paleo, or whatever is the latest food and diet trend. Remember Snackwells? Yeah, how many of us got ripped eating that crap?

Well, the same thing is happening – again. Paleo desserts are everywhere. So you ask, “But, why can’t I eat paleo cookies? Aren’t they good for me?” Yes, in small amounts, nuts and small amounts of sugar are fine. But, when we’re eating more than our fair share of sugar (natural or not), our health suffers.

Sugar is sugar. No matter what the source it can be detrimental when we get too much. Below, I talk about the pros and cons of different “healthy” sweeteners and how they affect your body so you can make more educated decisions about what types of sweeteners you use. And hopefully you also make the decision to limit the amounts of sugars you consume, paleo or not.

Fructose

fructose, honey, maple syrup, paleo sugar, agave, artifical sugar, HFCSFructose is the sugar found naturally in fruit. It is perfectly fine to consume fructose when you get it from whole foods like apples, which are about 7% fructose. Delivered this way, fructose comes with a host of vitamins, antioxidants, and fiber. But when it’s commercially extracted from fruit, then concentrated and made into a sweetener, it exacts a considerable metabolic price.

Research shows it’s the fructose part of sweeteners that’s the most dangerous. Fructose causes insulin resistance and significantly raises triglycerides (a risk factor for heart disease). It also increases fat around the middle, which in turn puts you at greater risk for diabetes, heart disease, and metabolic syndrome. Fructose has also been linked to non-alcoholic fatty-liver disease. Rats given high fructose diets develop a number of undesirable metabolic abnormalities including elevated triglycerides, weight gain, and extra abdominal fat.

You can buy fructose on its own and we’ve all heard of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and know of the health problems associated with itIt’s in your best interest to avoid fructose and HFCS altogether unless you are eating it in whole fruit form.

Agave

fructose, honey, maple syrup, paleo sugar, agave, artifical sugar, HFCSAgave is a plant from which tequila and agave syrup are made. It’s thought of as a healthy alternative to traditional table sugar because it has a lower glycemic indexHowever, agave syrup is nothing more than agave liquid that’s been heated and reduced (much like taking a fruit juice and heating it until it becomes more concentrated). So, it’s a super concentrated form of fructose. Not good. In addition, because agave syrup is basically a processed food product, the mineral and antioxidant content is very low.

In the agave plant, most of the sweetness comes from a particular kind of fructose called inulin that actually has some health benefits and is considered a fiber. But by the time it’s processed into syrup there’s not much inulin left. In the manufacturing process, enzymes are added to the inulin to break it down into digestible sugar (fructose), resulting in a syrup that has a fructose content that is at best 57% and, much more commonly, as high as 90%. To put this into perspective, table sugar is 50/50 glucose and fructose. HFCS is 55/45. Agave nectar is a whopping 90% fructose – almost twice as high as HFCS!

Honey

fructose, honey, maple syrup, paleo sugar, agave, artifical sugar, HFCSHoney is another natural sweetener that has a few more benefits than agave. Raw honey contains the phytonutrients caffeic acid, methyl caffeate, phenylethyl caffeate, and phenylethyl dimethylcaffeate. All of these have antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties to keep your immune system healthy and ward off colds and flus.

Because honey isn’t processed, the natural antioxidant and nutrients are preserved. It also has the added benefits of reducing seasonal allergy symptoms if local, raw honey is used daily (about 2 tsp/day). However, the fructose to glucose (and other sugars) ratio is about 50/44. Of course, that’s not ideal, so use restraint for the same reasons we avoid straight fructose or HFCS – and now agave, too, right?

fructose, honey, maple syrup, paleo sugar, agave, artifical sugar, HFCSMaple Syrup

Real maple syrup, not “maple flavored,” is another natural sweetener, like honey, that has some redeeming qualities. It isn’t processed so it still contains small amounts of several minerals and quite a bit of manganese and zinc. It also contains phenols that may function as antioxidants and may help prevent type 2 diabetes. Maple syrup is almost entirely sucrose, which in the end breaks down to fructose and glucose in the body. So, like any other sugar, it’s not the best thing to be feeding your body and should be used sparingly.

Artificial Sweeteners

This includes things like saccharin, sucralose (Splenda), aspartame (Equal), and otherartificial sweeteners. The huge con is that this stuff is just a bunch of chemicals! Yes, these products have low calorie content, but they may cause intense sugar cravings, cancers, weight gain, neurological problems, and numerous other issues. If you use them occasionally, it’s probably not a big deal. However, if you use them every day eventually it’s going to catch up with you in subtle if not very significant ways.

But if you are trying to justify using a shit ton of agave or honey in order to avoid chemical sweeteners your solution is flawedSugar causes cancer, heart disease, diabetes, fatty liver, and many other illnesses. The same problems we see with artificial sweeteners. So what’s the real solution? Losing the sweet tooth.

But wait, I’m not going to leave you completely hanging. Read on!

Stevia

fructose, honey, maple syrup, paleo sugar, agave, artifical sugar, HFCSFor those of you who are looking to seriously lower sugar intake and avoid calories and want a natural alternative, stevia may be your answer. Stevia is an herb that has been used for many years to sweeten naturally. It has virtually no calories, no effect on blood sugar levels, and has little no known side effects. However, it may trigger or feed sugar cravings. So it should be used sparingly or avoided if you are trying to kick a sugar addiction.

The powdered varieties of stevia have fillers and are often combined with sugar alcohols(ethryitol), which can add to the calorie content or cause some GI distress. (Ew.) So, the liquid varieties are usually your best bet. My personal favorite is the Sweet Leaf brand, which comes in a quite a few flavors and it’s easy to carry with you for coffee and tea breaks. Okay, it’s easy for girls to throw in our purses. Guys, invest in a murse.

I hope this help you to make wiser decisions when choosing recipes and the sweeteners to use. Honestly, I hope it makes you evaluate your sugar intake as a whole. Men should only be getting around 36 grams and women about 24 grams of sugar total per day. Track your food one day and then wonder just how in the heck you managed to eat that much sugar! Enjoy your treats but make sure they are treats and not everyday indulgences. Your body will thank you.

References:
1. Basaranoglu, Metin, Basaranoglu, Gokcen, Sabuncu, Tevfik, and Senturk, Hakan, “Fructose as a key player in the development of fatty liver disease”,  World Journal of Gastroenterology, 19(8) (2013): 1166–1172. Accessed September 11, 2013, doi:10.3748/wjg.v19.i8.1166
2. Basciana, Healther, Federico, Lisa and Adeli, Khosrow, “Fructose, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia,” Nutrition & Metabolism, 2 (2005) :5. Accessed September            
11, 2013, doi:10.1186/1743-7075-2-5
3. Stanhope KL, Schwarz JM, Keim NL, Griffen SC, Bremer AA, Graham JL, Hatcher B, Cox CL, Dyachenko A, Zhang W. et al., “Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adiposity and lipids and decreases insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese humans,” Journal of Clinical Investigation, 10(5)(2009):1322–1334. Accessed September 11, 2013, doi: 10.1172/JCI37385.
4. Takahashi, Yoshihisa, Soeiima, Yurie, and Fukusato, Toshio, “Animal models of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease/nonalcoholic steatohepatitis”, World Journal of Gastroenterology; 18(2012)(19): 2300–2308. Accessed September 11, 2013, doi:10.3748/wjg.v18.i19.2300

Honey and its many benefits to overall health and wellness

by Aurora Geib 

(NaturalNews) Honey is a popular sweetener produced from nectar, propolis or “bee glue” and enzymes in a bees’ saliva. Other insects produce honey but bee honey is the more popular kind. Honey is composed of simple sugars easily used by the body. It was the earliest reliable sweetener used in baking, enjoyed as spreads and added to drinks. It is also currently used in the manufacturing of certain processed foods like ham.

Light colored honeys are generally milder in flavor while darker ones are more robust. Depending on the bees’ nectar source, the color and flavor of honey may differ. There are currently more than 300 kinds of unique honey in the United States.

Forms of honey

Although honey is normally found in a liquid state, it can also change into a semi-solid state otherwise known as granulated honey. This condition can sometimes happen when glucose, the main sugar in honey, separates from the honey solution creating crystallization; losing its water content. The crystal then forms a framework that places other elements of honey into suspension resulting in the semi-solid state.

The displaced water condenses in some part of the container increasing moisture content; jump-starting the growth of yeast and fermentation. Although honey can sometimes crystallize on its own, dust and pollen or air bubbles can serve as triggers for crystallization of honey. To avoid crystallization, it is essential to store honey properly. Using air tight, moisture resistant containers is recommended when storing honey for long periods of time.

Honey that has crystallized; however, does not need to be thrown out as it has not gone bad. Heating it slowly in a warm bath will dissolve the sugar crystals back to liquid form. Other forms of honey include comb honey, which is honey in its original state, cut comb honey; which is liquid honey with added chunks of honey comb in the jar, liquid honey; which is honey extracted from the honey comb and whipped honey, which is brought to markets in a crystallized state. According to Honey.com, crystallization is controlled so that the honey can be spread at room temperature like jelly or butter. Whipped honey is a popular choice in certain parts of the world and, for breakfast, it is sometimes preferred over liquid honey.

Most of the honey available in the United States is in liquid form.

Uses of honey and its nutritional benefits

Honey is popularly known as a sweetener, but many do not know that it also contains nutritional and medical qualities praised by none other than Hippocrates, the father of medicine.

Nutritional Benefits

According to a Swiss study that discussed the nutritional value of honey, honey is rich in carbohydrates but has a low glycemic index (GI). Its GI varies within a range of 32 to 86 depending on the botanical source. Fructose rich honey, such as acacia honey, has a low GI; lower in fact than sucrose which is pegged at 60 to 110. Foods with low GI release glucose into the blood slowly and steadily; high GI foods cause blood sugar to spike. High GI foods are not suitable for diabetics; but those after a workout or are experiencing hypoglycemia will benefit from its ability to give immediate energy.

Honey contains the following trace minerals: potassium, magnesium, calcium, sodium, chloride, sulfur, iron, copper, iodine and zinc which although marginal, may contribute to the recommended daily intake requirements. It contains choline, a B-vitamin essential for brain and cardiovascular functions, cellular membrane composition and repair; and a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine.

Medical Benefits

Honey has anti-viral, anti-microbial and anti-parasitic effects. Its capacity to inhibit the growth of micro-organisms and fungi is well documented. The low water activity of honey inhibits bacterial growth and honey glucose oxidase produces the anti-bacterial agent hydrogen peroxide.

Depending on its botanical source, honey gives significant anti-oxidant activity protecting against oxidation responsible for chronic diseases. It also has anti-mutagenic, anti-tumor as well as anti-inflammatory qualities that stimulate anti-body production.

Honey is effective in dressing wounds. It has recently been used in clinical settings for treating fist sized ulcers extending to the bone as well as in the treatment of first, second and third degree burns. Complete recovery has been reported with no infections, muscle loss or any need of skin grafts. When the wounds are clean, honey acts as a healer. Garlic honey, which is just a mixture of honey and garlic, can be applied directly to infected wounds to clean the area. Dr. Peter Molan of Waikato University in New Zealand observed that honey was more effective in managing infections on burn wounds than anti-bacterial ointments used in hospitals.

Moreover, in a study conducted by Penn State University, honey was discovered to be better at alleviating cough than over the counter drugs. The study led by Dr. Ian Paul found that a small amount of buckwheat honey, given before bedtime, provided better relief for kids from night time cough and sleep difficulty than the use of dextromethorphan (DM). DM is an over the counter cold medication. This finding is significant in light of a recent Food and Drug Administration advisory that cautioned against giving cough and cold medicine to children below six years old due to its potential side effects ineffectiveness. Incidentally, consumers spend billion of dollars each year for medication not proven to give significant relief.

Who can benefit from honey?

Clinical studies have found that honey sits well with infants. It was observed to increase their weight, haemoglobin content, give them better skin and digestion while increasing their immunity from disease. In fact, honey has been observed to produce a mild laxative effect and is recognized as a treatment for constipation in Eastern Europe.

Athletes will find honey to be an effective source of carbohydrates that can improve their athletic performance. Patients suffering from hepatitis A can benefit from honey’s capacity to cause a decrease in the alanine aminotransferase activity (an increased ALT is indicative of liver damage) and a decrease in bilirubin production (a product breakdown responsible for the yellow color in bruises and urine and increased levels may indicate certain diseases). Among cancer patients undergoing cancer radiation therapy, honey was observed to reduce incidents of radiation mucositis, a common toxicity for head and neck cancer whose consequences include pain, weight loss and micro-nutrient deficiencies.

Side effects

Generally, honey is safe for children and adults even in large qualities. Avoid giving honey to infants under 12 months to avoid the risk of botulism poisoning. Allergic reactions to honey have also been reported in individuals allergic to pollen.

Nature’s sweetener – The health benefits of honey

by Ben Hirshberg 

(NaturalNews) Evidence shows that humans have been collecting and using honey for thousands of years. Humans have used honey in multiple ways, consuming it as an edible food and also using honey as a topical cream.

The first sign of humans gathering honey is a six thousand-year-old cave painting in Valencia, Spain, depicting a man climbing up a ladder to collect the sticky substance. Since then, honey has had an interesting history.

Honey has made appearances in Judaism, Buddhism, and Christianity, with John the Baptist surviving on only honey and locusts in the Old Testament. When Julius Caesar ruled Rome, honey was used interchangeably with gold as a currency substitute. Honey was quite popular with ancient Egyptians as well, as it was even used in their mummification processes.

Most modern humans stick to consuming honey, although those who are informed apply honey to their skin as well. Honey is most commonly thought of as an alternative sweetener however, used instead of sugar.

Better than sugar?

Honey is a complex substance that is made up of over 100 different compounds. Table sugar is a very different story; literally just made up of sucrose. Sugar has no nutritional value to speak of, devoid of vitamins, minerals, and other micronutrients. Honey, on the other hand, contains vitamins and minerals as well as significant levels of free radical fighting flavonoids and antioxidants.

These health properties of honey translate well under scientific examination. Vitamin E blood levels stay higher, blood levels don’t spike as high, and triglyceride levels are improved when honey is eaten instead of an artificial sweetener.

Other alleged health benefits of honey include increased calcium absorption and increased hemoglobin count. Honey has also been used to ease arthritis and help with constipation. One clinical trial found that honey improved indigestion, ulcers, and intestinal inflammation. Many allergy sufferers use honey with success, and one study even found a 60 percent reduction in birch pollen allergy symptoms with honey ingestion. A 2007 study by the Penn State College of Medicine gave clout to honey’s reputation as a cough medicine. The study showed honey outperforming an over the counter cough suppressant in severity, frequency, and bothersome nature of coughs.

Honey ointment

Honey contains an enzyme which produces hydrogen peroxide, making it useful for cuts and other wounds. Hydrogen peroxide disinfects lacerations and prevents bacteria from growing in the inflicted areas, making honey an excellent topical cut cream. Honey has even shown the potential to combat the notorious staph infection MRSA. Those same antibacterial characteristics give honey the ability to fight acne when applied to skin.

Research supports honey’s topical use as well. One study found that honey healed superficial burns more quickly and effectively than the standard medical treatment. Another study found that honey was more effective than the standard medical treatment at healing cesarean sections and abdominal hysterectomies. Honey allowed patients to be free of infection sooner as well as heal their scars faster.

However, not all honey is created equally. As with many foods, getting your honey local and organic will be superior from a nutritional standpoint. Additionally, most honeys have a higher antioxidant content as they get darker, so finding a dark variety of honey such as buckwheat should be prioritized too.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.asktheexterminator.com/bees/History_of_Honey.shtml
http://www.marksdailyapple.com
http://www.naturalhomeandgarden.com
http://www.naturalhomeandgarden.com
http://naturalsociety.com/health-benefits-of-honey-powerful-superfood/
http://www.apitherapy.org
http://live.psu.edu/story/27584


About the author:
My name is Ben Hirshberg and I am a student from Seattle. I am very passionate about living healthfully and am constantly learning. Nutrition is a big part of my health philosophy so I am always experimenting in the kitchen with different foods. Physical activity is also something that I believe strongly in, and I am currently getting my personal trainer certification from the World Instructor Training Schools. You can find more of my articles on nutrition, physical activity, recipes, and mental health at www.BenHirshberg.com

Honey Health: How The Sweet Stuff Keeps You Well

Honey Health
We know that, despite its high sugar content, honey has many healthful properties.
And now, according to the latest research, the sweet stuff has been found to treat mild nighttime coughs caused by upper respiratory infections among children between ages one and five. In a new study published in Pediatrics, researchers discovered that honey worked better than a placebo made from date syrup to maintain sleep and suppress coughs.
The researchers, led by Dr. Herman Avner Cohen of Tel Aviv University, found that among 300 children whose parents reported trouble sleeping do to infection-related nighttime coughs, those given honey improved their sleep and reduced their coughing by twice as much as those who took the placebo, according to reports submitted by their parents.
This isn’t the first study to find that honey helps childhood cough. One previous study found that honey was more successful in suppressing nighttime coughs and improving sleep than popular treatments dextromethorphan and diphenhydramine, reported WebMD.
It’s important to note that pediatricians caution against feeding honey to children under one year, because of a small concern that it can contain botulism toxin.
But for those over 12 months, cough and sleep aren’t the only benefits to the amber-colored nectar. Here’s the buzz on several other ways honey can improve your health:

Facts on Honey and Cinnamon: It is found that a mixture of honey and Cinnamon cures most diseases. – Fatal Facts

Posted Image

Cinnamon and Honey; Whoever thought? 

Honey is the only food on the planet that will not spoil or rot. What it will do is what some call ‘turning to sugar’. In reality, honey is always honey. However, when left in a cool dark place for a long time it will “crystallize”. When this happens loosen the lid, boil some water and sit the honey container in the hot water, but turn off the heat and let it liquefy naturally. It is then as good as it ever was. Never boil honey or put it in a microwave. This will kill the enzymes in the honey.

Cinnamon and Honey

Bet the drug companies won’t like this one getting around. Facts on Honey and Cinnamon: It is found that a mixture of honey and Cinnamon cures most diseases. Honey is produced in most of the countries of the world. Scientists of today also accept honey as a ‘Ram Ban’ (very effective) medicine for all kinds of diseases. Honey can be used without side effects for any kind of diseases.
Today’s science says that even though honey is sweet, when it is taken in the right dosage as a medicine, it does not harm even diabetic patients. Researched by western scientists:

HEART DISEASES: Make a paste of honey and cinnamon powder, apply it on bread instead of jelly and jam and eat it regularly for breakfast. It reduces the cholesterol in the arteries and saves the patient from heart attack. Also, those who have already had an attack, when they do this process daily, they are kept miles away from the next attack. Regular use of the above process relieves loss of breath and strengthens the heart beat. In America and Canada, various nursing homes have treated patients successfully and have found that as one ages the arteries and veins lose their flexibility and get clogged; honey and cinnamon revitalize the arteries and the veins.

ARTHRITIS: Arthritis patients may take daily (morning and night) one cup of hot water with two tablespoons of honey and one small teaspoon of cinnamon powder. When taken regularly even chronic arthritis can be cured. In a recent research conducted at the Copenhagen University, it was found that when the doctors treated their patients with a mixture of one tablespoon Honey and half teaspoon Cinnamon powder before breakfast, they found that within a week (out of the 200 people so treated) practically 73 patients were totally relieved of pain — and within a month, most all the patients who could not walk or move around because of arthritis now started walking without pain. 

BLADDER INFECTIONS: Take two tablespoons of cinnamon powder and one teaspoon of honey in a glass of lukewarm water and drink it. It destroys the germs in the bladder. 

CHOLESTEROL: Two tablespoons of honey and three teaspoons of Cinnamon Powder mixed in 16 ounces of tea water given to a cholesterol patient was found to reduce the level of cholesterol in the blood by 10 percent within two hours. As mentioned for arthritic patients, when taken three times a day, any chronic cholesterol is cured. According to information received in the said Journal, pure honey taken with food daily relieves complaints of cholesterol.

COLDS: Those suffering from common or severe colds should take one tablespoon lukewarm honey with 1/4 spoon cinnamon powder daily for three days. This process will cure most chronic cough, cold, and, clear the sinuses.

UPSET STOMACH: Honey taken with cinnamon powder cures stomach ache and also clears stomach ulcers from its root.
GAS: According to the studies done in India and Japan, it is revealed that when Honey is taken with cinnamon powder the stomach is relieved of gas.

IMMUNE SYSTEM: Daily use of honey and cinnamon powder strengthens the immune system and protects the body from bacterial and viral attacks. Scientists have found that honey has various vitamins and iron in large amounts. Constant use of Honey strengthens the white blood corpuscles (where DNA is contained) to fight bacterial and viral diseases.

INDIGESTION: Cinnamon powder sprinkled on two tablespoons of honey taken before food is eaten relieves acidity and digests the heaviest of meals

INFLUENZA: A scientist in Spain has proved that honey contains a natural ‘Ingredient’ which kills the influenza germs and saves the patient from flu.

LONGEVITY: Tea made with honey and cinnamon powder, when taken regularly, arrests the ravages of old age. Use four teaspoons of honey, one teaspoon of cinnamon powder, and three cups of boiling water to make a tea. Drink 1/4 cup, three to four times a day. It keeps the skin fresh and soft and arrests old age. Life spans increase and even a 100 year old will start performing the chores of a 20-year-old.

RASPY OR SORE THROAT: When throat has a tickle or is raspy, take one tablespoon of honey and sip until gone. Repeat every three hours until throat is without symptoms.

PIMPLES: Three tablespoons of honey and one teaspoon of cinnamon powder paste. Apply this paste on the pimples before sleeping and wash it off the next morning with warm water. When done daily for two weeks, it removes all pimples from the root.

SKIN INFECTIONS:Applying honey and cinnamon powder in equal parts on the affected parts cures eczema, ringworm and all types of skin Infections.

WEIGHT LOSS:Daily in the morning one half hour before
breakfast and on an empty stomach, and at night before sleeping, drink honey and cinnamon powder boiled in one cup of water. When taken regularly, it reduces the weight of even the most obese person. Also, drinking this mixture regularly does not allow the fat to accumulate in the body even though the person may eat a high calorie diet.

CANCER: Recent research in Japan and Australia has revealed that advanced cancer of the stomach and bones have been cured successfully. Patients suffering from these kinds of cancer should daily take one tablespoon of honey with one teaspoon of cinnamon powder three times a day for one month.

FATIGUE: Recent studies have shown that the sugar content of honey is more helpful rather than being detrimental to the strength of the body. Senior citizens who take honey and cinnamon powder in equal parts are more alert and flexible. Dr. Milton, who has done research, says that a half tablespoon of honey taken in a glass of water and sprinkled with cinnamon powder, even when the vitality of the body starts to decrease, when taken daily after brushing and in the afternoon at about 3:00 P.M., the vitality of the body increases within a week.

BAD BREATH: People of South America, gargle with one teaspoon of honey and cinnamon powder mixed in hot water first thing in the morning so their breath stays fresh throughout the day.

HEARING LOSS: Daily morning and night honey and cinnamon powder, taken in equal parts restores hearing. Remember when we were kids? We had toast with real butter and cinnamon sprinkled on it!

You might want to share this information with a friend, kinfolks and loved ones. Everyone needs healthy help information ~ what they do with it is up to them. You may also want to share this with your email buddies… They deserve to be healthy too! 
Wikio

How long does OJ keep before it loses vitamins?

Since we’re not big juice drinkers in our house, OJ usually only makes its way into our fridge when guests come to visit. Even then, it still takes us a few weeks to polish off the carton. I never thought much about keeping the OJ for a few weeks. After all, it still tastes good—and we usually finish it before the expiration date. Then I read this study that showed opened OJ loses all antioxidant benefit after just one week! Seriously? Well, as you can imagine, this led me to wonder if other items in my kitchen lose their health punch over time. (Spoiler alert: they do!)

Keep track of how long you store these 4 items. Here’s why: certain nutrients are unstable when exposed to oxygen (from the air), heat (from cooking) and light.

Orange juice: 1 week
One cup of OJ can offer a full day’s dose of vitamin C. But OJ that has been opened loses all antioxidant benefit after just one week. To get the most vitamin C, buy frozen concentrate and drink within a few days. Frozen concentrate is exposed to less light and air. (Use your OJ before it loses its nutritional punch: make Grilled Orange Chicken Fingers and more delicious recipes with orange juice.)

Green tea: 6 months
A 2009 study in the Journal of Food Science showed that catechins (antioxidants linked with a reduced risk of some cancers) in green tea decreased markedly over time. After six months, catechin levels were 32 percent lower. Make the most of the antioxidants by storing tea in a sealed container in a dark, cool place.
(Add this 1 ingredient to your tea to make it healthier.)

Olive oil: 6 months
Extra-virgin olive oil contains more than 45 heart-healthy antioxidants, but after six months of storage their potency decreases by about 40 percent, according to researchers at the University of Foggia in Italy. Why? Oxygen bubbles in the bottle destroy the antioxidants.
(Find out which brands won our Olive Oil Taste Test and find out how to shop for the healthiest and tastiest olive oil.)

Honey: 6 months
Researchers at the University of Illinois found the antioxidant power of clover and buckwheat honey decreased by 30 to 50 percent after six months. Consider buying buckwheat honey—it generally has more antioxidants to start with.
(Can honey help you lose weight?)

By Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D.

Brierley’s interest in nutrition and food come together in her position as an associate editor at EatingWell. Brierley holds a master’s degree in Nutrition Communication from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. A Registered Dietitian, she completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Vermont.

Wikio

%d bloggers like this: